Sustainability

Category Archives: Responsible Packaging

7 Ways to Launch Your Own Anti-Plastics Movement

We have a whole world of plastic that needs to be replaced with other biodegradable materials. We have come to rely on this indestructible modern material for every single facet of daily life.

The food you ate today was probably sold in plastic packaging, the vehicle you transport yourself in has plastic components, be that a car, bus, bike, train, plane, boat, kayak … the computer you are reading this article on, even the charger and the wall socket protector … just look around.

https://www.ecowatch.com/toward-a-plastic-free-future-2519406874.html

‘Zero tolerance’ plan eyed for plastic pollution

A plan for zero tolerance of plastic pollution of the oceans may be agreed by nations at a UN environment summit.

Governments are being asked to move towards a legal treaty banning plastic waste from entering the sea.

At the moment ships are prohibited from dumping plastic overboard but there’s no international law against plastics flooding into the sea from the land.

Experts say ocean plastics are an obvious subject for a global treaty: plastics present a large-scale threat.

Plastic pollution doesn’t recognise international borders.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42190678

UN commits to stop ocean plastic waste

Nations have agreed that the world needs to completely stop plastic waste from entering the oceans.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42239895

Refillable glass bottles are making a comeback

According to the Beer Institute, Americans consume an average of 32 gallons of beer every year. (To no one’s surprise, Nevada tops the list at 44 gallons per year. California is more restrained, below the nation’s average, at 26 gallons per year.)

While this avid consumption is good for the growing beer market, the lack of an established bottle refilling program makes it exceedingly wasteful, too. But Caren McNamara, founder of Conscious Container, based in Truckee, sees a solution: bringing back the practice of reusing and refilling glass bottles.

https://www.newsreview.com/reno/bottle-it-up/content?oid=25360238

Seafood lovers eat 11,000 pieces of plastic each year with just one portion of mussels containing up to 90 particles, scientists warn

If your diet includes seafood it could mean you’re swallowing up to 11,000 pieces of plastic a year, scientists have warned – and it’s going to get worse.

Researchers found that the average portion of mussels contains around 90 plastic particles, while six oysters contain around 50 particles.

This means someone eating the equivalent of two portions of mussels a week would swallow up to 11,000 plastic fibres in a year.

 http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5138133/Seafood-lovers-eat-11-000-pieces-plastic-year.html#ixzz509a9by6i 

‘Zero tolerance’ plan eyed for plastic pollution

A plan for zero tolerance of plastic pollution of the oceans may be agreed by nations at a UN environment summit.

Governments are being asked to move towards a legal treaty banning plastic waste from entering the sea.

At the moment ships are prohibited from dumping plastic overboard but there’s no international law against plastics flooding into the sea from the land.

Experts say ocean plastics are an obvious subject for a global treaty: plastics present a large-scale threat.

Plastic pollution doesn’t recognise international borders.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42190678

Popularity of plastic takes toll on oceans, puts human health at risk

Our love affair with plastic—from water bottles, shopping bags, and drinking straws, to consumer product packaging—is taking a toll on the world’s oceans, and damaging the health of people, marine birds, and animals. The filmmakers and scientists behind a new documentary exploring this problem recently joined Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health community members for a film screening and panel discussion. Experts offered solutions for policymakers, as well as steps ordinary citizens can take to reduce plastic pollution.

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/features/plastic-pollution-harms-oceans-health/

California Creates Definition of “PET” for Resin Coding

 

Existing law in California requires that rigid plastic containers and rigid plastic bottles be marked with a resin identification code. Bill AB 906, signed by the governor on October 15, creates a definition for PET; beginning on October 1, 2018, containers and bottles marked as “1-PET” will have to meet the new definition. In practice, the new definition will mean that PET-G plastics will no longer be able to be marked as “1-PET” and will have to be marked as “7-Other”.
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