Sustainability

Category Archives: Zero Waste

GREEK YOGURT WASTE COULD BE USED IN JET FUEL AND LIVESTOCK FEED

Your Greek yogurt creates food waste that could one day be used in jet fuel.

That’s right—when Greek yogurt is made, it leaves behind liquid whey, which is the watery remains after protein is strained from milk. A process that mixes this waste with thousands of species of bacteria and some heat transforms the whey into a new material called bio-oil, which could be used in biofuels or additives in livestock feed.

http://www.newsweek.com/2017/12/29/greek-yogurt-waste-could-be-used-jet-fuel-and-livestock-feed-746965.html

and

Waste streams can be renewable feedstocks to produce biofuels and chemicals. Acid whey is an example waste stream and is produced by the Greek-yogurt industry in large volumes. This whey and other waste streams have been successfully converted into methane gas by anaerobic digesters with open cultures of microbial consortia (microbiomes). However, the revenue from methane has been relatively low. Until now, no other products could be produced with microbiomes from this waste stream. This has now changed. Here, we showed that acid whey was converted into valuable medium-chain carboxylic acids (MCCAs), such as n-caproic acid (n-hexanoic acid) and n-caprylic acid (n-octanoic acid), without addition of external electron acceptors.

http://www.cell.com/joule/fulltext/S2542-4351(17)30179-4

 

When and how to use the term ‘zero waste’ — and when to avoid it

As cities across the country, from Los Angeles to New York City, take “zero waste” pledges, it is clear that “zero waste” is transforming from a trend into a movement. From a sustainability perspective, the central goal of most “zero waste” initiatives — achieving 90 percent diversion — is a clear winner.

But from a communications perspective, “zero waste” is still unclear and potentially confusing. Not only does the term “zero waste” not necessarily mean what it says, but it can be polarizing. How can we most effectively communicate the waste reduction message encapsulated in the term “zero waste”? Do we need the term “zero waste” to guide our consumption and waste behaviors, or are we better off without it?

https://www.wastedive.com/news/zero-waste-pledge-confusion-opinion/512638/

UN commits to stop ocean plastic waste

Nations have agreed that the world needs to completely stop plastic waste from entering the oceans.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42239895

Refillable glass bottles are making a comeback

According to the Beer Institute, Americans consume an average of 32 gallons of beer every year. (To no one’s surprise, Nevada tops the list at 44 gallons per year. California is more restrained, below the nation’s average, at 26 gallons per year.)

While this avid consumption is good for the growing beer market, the lack of an established bottle refilling program makes it exceedingly wasteful, too. But Caren McNamara, founder of Conscious Container, based in Truckee, sees a solution: bringing back the practice of reusing and refilling glass bottles.

https://www.newsreview.com/reno/bottle-it-up/content?oid=25360238

Seafood lovers eat 11,000 pieces of plastic each year with just one portion of mussels containing up to 90 particles, scientists warn

If your diet includes seafood it could mean you’re swallowing up to 11,000 pieces of plastic a year, scientists have warned – and it’s going to get worse.

Researchers found that the average portion of mussels contains around 90 plastic particles, while six oysters contain around 50 particles.

This means someone eating the equivalent of two portions of mussels a week would swallow up to 11,000 plastic fibres in a year.

 http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5138133/Seafood-lovers-eat-11-000-pieces-plastic-year.html#ixzz509a9by6i 

‘Zero tolerance’ plan eyed for plastic pollution

A plan for zero tolerance of plastic pollution of the oceans may be agreed by nations at a UN environment summit.

Governments are being asked to move towards a legal treaty banning plastic waste from entering the sea.

At the moment ships are prohibited from dumping plastic overboard but there’s no international law against plastics flooding into the sea from the land.

Experts say ocean plastics are an obvious subject for a global treaty: plastics present a large-scale threat.

Plastic pollution doesn’t recognise international borders.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42190678

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